0
Get Alert
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
You must sign in to sign-up for alerts.

Please confirm that your email address is correct, so you can successfully receive this alert.

Article   |    
Neighborhood locations of Section 8 housing certificate users with and without mental illness
Psychiatric Services 1996; doi:
text A A A
PDF of the full text article.
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The study examined whether participants with mental illness in the federal Section 8 housing subsidy program settle in neighborhoods different from those of Section 8 participants without mental illness. The nature of these differences and the reasons they occur were also examined. METHODS. Data sources included the Section 8 survey for Baltimore and Cincinnati of the national evaluation of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Program on Chronic Mental Illness, police records, and 1990 census tract files, supplemented with the addresses of all Section 8 users and mental health services in both cities. Analyses consisted of calculations of dissimilarity indexes, comparisons of means, and multiple regressions. RESULTS. Dissimilarity index scores were .54 for Baltimore and .48 for Cincinnati, indicating that roughly half of all Section 8 users with mental illness would have to move to eliminate neighborhood disparities between them and Section 8 users without mental illness. Section 8 users with mental illness settled in somewhat better neighborhoods than those without mental illness. This finding was largely attributable to the sizable disparities in the racial composition of the two groups of Section 8 users: a greater proportion of users with mental illness were white. CONCLUSIONS. The neighborhood quality of Section 8 users with mental illness was found to be at least as high as that for users without mental illness. It is not clear whether the Section 8 program of the Program on Chronic Mental Illness disproportionately served whites, although the racial composition of the Section 8 program in both cities is disproportionately black.

Abstract Teaser
Figures in this Article

Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In to Access Full Content
 
Username
Password
Sign in via Athens (What is this?)
Athens is a service for single sign-on which enables access to all of an institution's subscriptions on- or off-site.
Not a subscriber?

Subscribe Now/Learn More

PsychiatryOnline subscription options offer access to the DSM-5 library, books, journals, CME, and patient resources. This all-in-one virtual library provides psychiatrists and mental health professionals with key resources for diagnosis, treatment, research, and professional development.

Need more help? PsychiatryOnline Customer Service may be reached by emailing PsychiatryOnline@psych.org or by calling 800-368-5777 (in the U.S.) or 703-907-7322 (outside the U.S.).

+

References

+
+

CME Activity

There is currently no quiz available for this resource. Please click here to go to the CME page to find another.
Submit a Comments
Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discertion of APA editorial staff.

* = Required Field
(if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
Example: John Doe



Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Related Content
Articles
Books
The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Geriatric Psychiatry, 4th Edition > Chapter 32.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 16.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 40.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 16.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 16.  >
Psychiatric News
Read more at Psychiatric News >>
PubMed Articles