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Article   |    
Characteristics and Behavior of Patients Involved in Psychiatric Ward Incidents
Hyung Kon Lee; Ofeliar Villar; Nalini Juthani; Harvey Bluestone
Psychiatric Services 1989; doi:
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The authors express their appreciation to Mary Jane Perez, Frank Thompson, and Richard Lee for their assistance with manuscript preparation.

Department of Psychiatry of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 321 East Tremont Avenue, Bronx, New York 10457, The quality assurance committee

Department of Psychiatry of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 321 East Tremont Avenue, Bronx, New York 10457, The Department of Psychiatry at the Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center

1989 by the American Psychiatric Association

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Abstract

Although psychiatric diagnosis cannot effectively predict incidents except assaults, patient behavior patterns may be valuable for predicting the type of incident for which a patient might be vulnerable. When a patient, particularly a young male, becomes hyperactive, loud, and hostile, it is imperative to control the behavior with pharmacological on other means to avert potential violence. If a depressed patient, particularly a middle-aged woman, shows a significant level of anxiety and apprehension, it is important to observe the patient closely with continuing reassurance to prevent a potential suicide attempt. When a patient becomes markedly withdrawn, lethargic, and confused, a vigorous medical assessment is warranted to provide timely treatment for potentially life-threatening medical conditions. Thus careful monitoring of patients' behavior can direct staff members in the necessary precautions to take to prevent potential incidents.

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