0
Get Alert
Please Wait... Processing your request... Please Wait.
You must sign in to sign-up for alerts.

Please confirm that your email address is correct, so you can successfully receive this alert.

Articles   |    
Use of Outpatient Mental Health Services Among Children of Different Ages: Are Younger Children More Seriously Ill?
Sarah M. Horwitz, Ph.D.; Amy Storfer-Isser, Ph.D.; Christine Demeter, M.A.; Eric A. Youngstrom, Ph.D.; Thomas W. Frazier, Ph.D.; Mary A. Fristad, Ph.D., A.B.P.P.; L. Eugene Arnold, M.D.; David Axelson, M.D.; Boris Birmaher, M.D.; Robert A. Kowatch, M.D., Ph.D.; Robert L. Findling, M.D., M.B.A.
Psychiatric Services 2014; doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.201300209
View Author and Article Information

Dr. Horwitz is with the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York (e-mail: sarah.horwitz@nyumc.org). Dr. Storfer-Isser is with Statistical Research Consultants, L.L.C., Schaumburg, Illinois. Ms. Demeter is with the Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. Youngstrom is with the Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Frazier is with the Center for Pediatric Behavioral Health, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland. Dr. Fristad, Dr. Arnold, and Dr. Axelson are with the Department of Psychiatry, Ohio State University, Columbus, where Dr. Fristad is also with the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Dr. Birmaher is with the Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Dr. Kowatch is with the Department of Psychiatry, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus. Dr. Findling is with the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, and with the Department of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, Baltimore.

Copyright © 2014 by the American Psychiatric Association

text A A A
PDF of the full text article.
Abstract

Objective  The study compared use of specialty outpatient mental services among children ages six and seven and children ages eight through 12 and investigated predictors of differences in the patterns of service use by age.

Methods  Eligible children were first-time patients of clinics participating in the Longitudinal Assessment of Manic Symptoms who were between ages six and 12 and who were English speaking. Children who screened positive for symptoms of mania (N=1,124) were invited to participate, and families of 621 (55%) children consented. A matched sample of 86 children without a positive screen for mania also participated. Baseline interviews assessed sociodemographic characteristics of the child and family and the child’s functioning, diagnoses, and use of services.

Results  Of the 707 children, 30% were younger, and 50% used multiple types of specialty outpatient services. Younger children were more likely to be male, have Medicaid insurance, and have two parents with mental health problems. Use of multiple types of services was related to study site, high depression scores, fewer minor health issues, and fewer stressful life events among younger children and with parental stress, primary diagnosis, poor functioning, and not living with both parents among older children. Younger children were much more likely than older children to have used services before age six.

Conclusions  Younger children showed very early use of multiple types of services for mental health problems and a pattern of persistent impairment despite long-standing use of services. These data argue strongly for focusing on emotional and behavioral issues among young children.

Abstract Teaser
Figures in this Article

Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.
Sign In to Access Full Content
 
Username
Password
Sign in via Athens (What is this?)
Athens is a service for single sign-on which enables access to all of an institution's subscriptions on- or off-site.
Not a subscriber?

Subscribe Now/Learn More

PsychiatryOnline subscription options offer access to the DSM-5 library, books, journals, CME, and patient resources. This all-in-one virtual library provides psychiatrists and mental health professionals with key resources for diagnosis, treatment, research, and professional development.

Need more help? PsychiatryOnline Customer Service may be reached by emailing PsychiatryOnline@psych.org or by calling 800-368-5777 (in the U.S.) or 703-907-7322 (outside the U.S.).

+

References

+
+

CME Activity

There is currently no quiz available for this resource. Please click here to go to the CME page to find another.
Submit a Comments
Please read the other comments before you post yours. Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest.
Comments are moderated and will appear on the site at the discertion of APA editorial staff.

* = Required Field
(if multiple authors, separate names by comma)
Example: John Doe



Related Content
Articles
Books
Textbook of Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition > Chapter 32.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 62.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 62.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 62.  >
Dulcan's Textbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry > Chapter 61.  >
Topic Collections
Psychiatric News
APA Guidelines
PubMed Articles